" /> Historical Location

ADANA

Adana Province: ADANA

ADANA

According to an ancient Greco-Roman legend, the name has its origins in Adanus and Sarus, the two sons of Uranus, who came to a place near the Seyhan (Sarus) River, where they built Adana. An older legend relates the city's name to Adad (also known as Tesup or Ishkur), the Thunder God in the Akkadian, Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian and Hittite mythologies, who was believed to live in the nearby forest, and whose name was given to the region. The Hittites' names and writings have been found in the area, evidencing this possibility. The theory goes that since the Thunder God brought so much rain and this rain in turn brought such great abundance in this particular region, this god was loved and respected by its inhabitants and, in his honor, the region was called the "Uru Adaniyya"; in other words "the Region of Ada".


Adana (pronounced [aˈda.na]), is a city in southern Turkey and a major agricultural, industry and commercial center. It is the fifth most populous city in Turkey. The city is situated on the Seyhan River, 30 kilometres (19 miles) inland from the Mediterranean Sea, in south-central Anatolia. It is the administrative seat of the Adana Province and has a population of 2.1 million, making it the most populated city of the region. Adana-Mersin metropolitan area, with a population of over 6 million, stretches over 70 kilometres (43 miles) from east to west and 25 kilometres (16 miles) from north to south; encompassing the cities of Mersin, Tarsus and Adana.
Adana lies in the heart of Çukurova, a geographical, economical and cultural region that covers the provinces of Mersin, Adana, Osmaniye, and Hatay. Home to approximately six million people,[2] the region is mostly a large stretch of flat, fertile land regarded as one of the most agriculturally productive areas of the world.
Etymology
According to numerous sources, the name Adana is derived from the Hittite URUAdaniya of Kizzuwatna,[3] while others assert that it is related to the legendary character Danaus, or to the Danaoi, a mythological Greek tribe who came from Egypt[citation needed] and established themselves in the Greek city Argos.The earlier Egyptian texts for a country Danaja are inscriptions from Thutmosis II (1437 BC) and Amenophis III (1390-1352 BC).[4] After the collapse of the Mycenean civilization (1200 BC) some refugeees from the Aegean area went to the coast of Cilicia. The inhabitants Dananayim or Danuna are identified as one group of the sea-peoples who attacked Egypt on 1191 BC during the reign of Ramesses III.[5] Denyen are identified as inhabitants of the city Adana. It is also possible that the name is connected with the PIE da-nu (river) Da-na-vo (people living by the river), Scythian nomad people, water demons in Rigveda (Danavas).[6]
In the Iliad of Homer, the city is called Adana. In Hellenistic times, it was known as Antiochia in Cilicia (Ἀντιόχεια τῆς Κιλικίας) or Antiochia ad Sarum (Ἀντιόχεια ἡ πρὸς Σάρον; "Antiochia on the Sarus"). The editors of The Helsinki Atlas tentatively identify Adana as Quwê (as contained in cuneiform tablets), the Neo-Assyrian capital of Quwê province. The name also appears as Coa, and may be the place referred to in the Bible, where King Solomon obtained horses. (I Kings 10:28; II Chron. 1:16).[7] The Armenian name of the city is Ատանա Atana or Ադանա Adana.
According to an ancient Greco-Roman legend, the name has its origins in Adanus and Sarus, the two sons of Uranus, who came to a place near the Seyhan (Sarus) River, where they built Adana.[8] An older legend relates the city's name to Adad (also known as Tesup or Ishkur), the Thunder God in the Akkadian, Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian and Hittite mythologies, who was believed to live in the nearby forest, and whose name was given to the region.[citation needed] The Hittites' names and writings have been found in the area, evidencing this possibility. The theory goes that since the Thunder God brought so much rain and this rain in turn brought such great abundance in this particular region, this god was loved and respected by its inhabitants and, in his honor, the region was called the "Uru Adaniyya"; in other words "the Region of Ada".
Adana's name has had many different versions over the centuries: Adanos, Ta Adana, Uru Adaniya, Erdene, Edene, Ezene, Batana, Atana, Azana, Addane.
The Great Clock Tower
Büyük Saat (English: The Great Clock Tower) is the tallest clock tower in Turkey, rising 32 m (105 ft) high. It is located in the old town of Adana on Ali Münif Caddesi.[1]
History
The construction of Büyük Saat was started in 1879 by the governor Ziya Pasha and it was completed by the succeeding governor Abidin Pasha in 1882, as a symbol of modernization. The two Armenian architects, Krikor Agha Bzdikian and Kasbar Agha Bzdikian, were responsible for its design. Mayor Hacı Yunus also had a significant contribution to the construction. Since then, it stands as one of the major landmarks of the city.
Büyük Saat was damaged during French occupation and had renovated in 1935.
Büyük Saat was constructed as a square prism and tower walls were built by bricks.[2] The tower has a height of 32 m (105 ft), but the depth of the foundation is thought to be even longer. Foundation is said to be 35 m (115 ft) deep. There were rumors that the water that springs from the foundation was very healing.
During the period of its construction, there were also clock towers built in the other large cities of the Ottoman Empire. Büyük Saat was the highest among them, second highest being the Dolmabahçe Clock Tower in İstanbul.
Function
The construction made the residents' life easier. Every hour, the loud bell of the tower would ring, which could be heard from most sections of the city. After the construction of the tower, the city officials arranged their office hours by Büyük Saat. Islamic praying times were also set by Büyük Saat which used to be done by the position of the sun before.
Major issue with Büyük Saat today is the lack of pedestrian areas at its base. The tower is in the middle of a busy street which makes visitor access difficult. The Greater Municipality have plans to widen sidewalks at Ali Münif Caddesi and re-route some of the local transit to another street.
Taşköprü (Adana)
Taşköprü (English: Stone Bridge) is a Roman bridge spanning the Seyhan River in Adana. Throughout ancient Anatolia and Persia, the bridge was a vital contribution to the trade routes and until 2007, it was one of the oldest bridges in the world to be open to motorized vehicles. It was then set for pedestrians only, now hosting social and cultural events.
The bridge was known with different names throughout the history; Saros bridge, Justinian bridge and finally Taşköprü.
Sabancı Merkez Camii
	
	
	
	
	
	
Sabancı Merkez Camii (English: Sabancı Central Mosque) in Adana is the largest mosque in Turkey.[2] The exterior of the mosque is similar to the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque) in Istanbul while the interior decoration is similar to the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne.
Sabanci Central Mosque, which went into service in 1998, is built on a total of 52,600 square meter of land and has a closed area of 6,600 square meters. .[3]
The Mosque was constructed upon a confiscated Armenian cemetery.[4][5][6]
Sabanci Central Mosque was built jointly by Turkish Religious Foundation and Sabanci Foundation. The proprietorship of the mosque belongs to Adana Religious Affairs Foundation and its usage rights have been transferred to Adana Provincial Office of Mufti.

Ulu Cami (English: The Grand Mosque) külliye, enclosed within a high wall in the old town, stands to be the most interesting medieval structure of Adana, with the mosque, madrasah and türbe.[1] It is located on Kızılay street, next to Ramazanoğlu Hall.

Adana Archaeology Museum, (Turkish: Adana Arkeoloji Müzesi), located just west of the Sabancı Mosque in Adana, houses the historical heritage of Çukurova region. It is one of the oldest ten museums of Turkey.

Pictures